A weekend at the Kiwanis Wyoming County Fair

Today’s post contributed by Bill desRosiers, Coordinator of External Affairs.

While Marcellus Shale has the potential to define Northeast Pennsylvania for the next one hundred years, something else has captured the hearts and minds of some many here for the last one hundred – county fairs. These annual events not only promote the area and its agricultural products; they are an opportunity for the local farmers to relax after the summer harvest. The Kiwanis Wyoming County Fair in particular was first held in 1857 but its run ended in 1944 because of World War II. In 1985 the fair was reopened and has blossomed into what it is today.

Cabot Oil & Gas Corporation took to the fair this Labor Day weekend in order to show off two vehicles powered by compressed natural gas (CNG). These vehicles, a 2012 Chevy Silverado 1500 and a 1955 Chevy, have been converted to run on both gasoline and CNG. The dichotomy between the two illustrates that almost any vehicle, new or old, can run on natural gas. Just watch Mike Faillace explain why he’s converted his 1955 Chevy to run on CNG.

By the end of the fair, roughly 500 hundred fair patrons stopped in the Cabot tent to inspect these vehicles and to ask questions. Here are some of the more frequently asked questions and answers:

Why CNG?

CNG is a domestic fuel source with unlimited potential. Instead of relying on foreign oil & gasoline, CNG can be made right here in the United States. Compared with vehicles fueled by conventional diesel and gasoline, natural gas vehicles can produce lower levels of some emissions, depending on vehicle type, drive cycle, and engine calibration. And because CNG fuel systems are completely sealed, CNG vehicles produce no evaporative emissions. Visit FuelEconomy.gov to find more information about the environmental benefits and petroleum savings of commercially available light-duty natural gas vehicles.

How does it work?

CNG is stored under pressure in a vehicle. Like gasoline, when an engine needs fuel, CNG is fed to the engine. A special regulator will reduce the CNG from 3000psi to slightly above atmospheric pressure where it moves into a carburetor or fuel injector before entering an engine’s combustion chamber.

How much does it cost to fuel up?

CNG is significantly cheaper than traditional fuels; however simple comparisons of price are difficult for a number of reasons. In the end, CNG is much cheaper than gasoline or diesel. Please consult CNGprices.com for an interactive map displaying real-time cost across the country.

If you have any specific questions regarding CNG please share them in the comment section and we will do our best to answer them.

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